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The Impressive Windows Of Castle Tucker, Wiscasset, Maine

Maine: Wiscasset & Castle Tucker

Located along coastal Route 1, Wiscasset, Maine, is a picture-perfect small town and a great place to stop and enjoy a quintessential mid-coast Maine day. This Maine town is full of historic buildings, offers amazing antiquing, some unique stays, and first-rate lobster rolls.

Just north of Boothbay Harbor and south of Augusta, Wiscasset sits on the Sheepscot River. It is a short ride to the ocean waters and situated deep in one of Maine’s craggy coastline fingers jutting out into the Atlantic.

Some history here …

In 1605, Samuel de Champlain is said to have landed here and exchanged gifts with the Indians. Situated on the tidal Sheepscot River, Wiscasset was first settled by Europeans in 1660. The community was abandoned during the French and Indian Wars, and the King Philip’s War in 1675 and then resettled around 1730. In 1760, it was incorporated as Pownalborough after Colonial Governor Thomas Pownall. In 1802, it resumed its original Abenaki name, Wiscasset, which means “coming out from the harbour but you don’t see where.”

During the Revolutionary War, the British warship Rainbow harboured itself in Wiscasset Harbor and held the town at bay until the town gave the warship essential supplies.

In 1775, Captain Jack Bunker supposedly robbed the payroll of a British supply ship, Falmouth Packet, that was stowed in Wiscasset Harbor. He was chased for days and caught on Little Seal Island. His treasure reportedly has never been found.

Because of the siege during the Revolutionary War, Fort Edgecomb was built in 1808 on the opposite bank of the Sheepscot to protect the town harbour. Wiscasset’s prosperity left behind fine early architecture, particularly in the Federal style when the seaport was important in privateering. Two dwellings of the period, Castle Tucker and the Nickels-Sortwell House are now museums operated by Historic New England.

The seaport became a centre for shipbuilding, fishing and lumber. Wiscasset quickly became the busiest seaport north of Boston until the embargo of 1807 halted much trade with England. Most of Wiscasset’s business and trade was destroyed.

The Sheepscot River in Wiscasset, Maine

We decided to do a tour of Castle Tucker, one of the historic homes in Wiscasset. The house is maintained by Historic New England, who look after many historic buildings throughout New England.

Dramatically sited on a hill overlooking the Sheepscot River, Castle Tucker tells the story of a prominent shipping family’s life on the coast of Maine over a period of 150 years. From 1858 until the end of the twentieth century, both the Tucker family and their imposing house survived economic upheavals, emotional turmoil, and a rapidly changing outside world.

Built in 1807, the house was later redecorated and furnished to satisfy modern Victorian tastes and sensibilities. A visit to Castle Tucker offers a glimpse into the everyday life of Mollie and Richard Tucker and their five children at the turn of the twentieth century. With three generations of family possessions on view, Castle Tucker is a time capsule that echoes with the voices of a remarkable Maine family.

We had booked into the last tour of the day, and in fact, we ended up being the only people on the tour – which was great. The volunteer guide was Paul a fellow Brit! The tour took about and hour and a bit and it was fascinating to hear the stories about the people who called this place home and their role in the local community. Having Paul to ourselves meant we could ask as many questions as we wanted (not all about the house itself!)

The front entrance of Caste Tucker
The main reception room of Castle Tucker
One of the bedrooms
A stove in the kitchen
The pantry

Planning your visit to Castle Tucker

Address:2 Lee Street, Wiscasset, Maine 04578
Website:historicnewengland.org/
Telephone:T: 207-882-7169
Hours:

Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays
June 4 – October 17

Tours every half hour
11 AM – 3 PM

Admission Fees

$15 adults
$13 seniors
$7 students

Best time to visit Wiscasset

The best time to visit Wiscasset in Maine is from June until September when you will have a pleasant temperature and little to no rainfall. The highest average temperature in Wiscasset is 77°F in July and the lowest is 28°F in January.

Wiscasset has the continental climate prevailing. If you want to know what the average temperature is in Wiscasset or when most precipitation (rain or snow) falls, you can find a quick overview below. This way, you are well prepared

Where to stay in Wiscasset

1. SHEEPSCOT HARBOUR VILLAGE RESORT

Sheepscot Harbor Village Resort in Edgecomb is located on the Sheepscot River, just over the bridge from Wiscasset. Free WiFi is available.

The property offers various accommodations including cottages, inn rooms and waterfront lodge rooms. Inn rooms are equipped with a spa bath.

The Sheepscot Harbor Village Resort is a vacation rental property with weekly cottages and nightly guest rooms.

2. SHEEPSCOT BEAUTY

Located in Wiscasset, Sheepscot Beauty has self-catering accommodations with a patio and free WiFi. The property is 7 miles from Newcastle.

The air-conditioned apartment also provides a TV, a fully equipped kitchenette with a microwave, a seating area, and a bathroom with a bath or shower.

3. COD COVE INN

The Cod Cove Inn offers the privacy of a hotel with the warm, friendly atmosphere of a coastal inn. The Cod Cove Inn is the ideal destination for those who wish to explore Maine’s beautiful Midcoast region. The Inn is located midway between Boston and Bar Harbor and minutes from Freeport, Camden, Rockland, Boothbay Harbor and Damariscotta.

The Inn features four acres of sweeping lawns and groomed gardens, a heated swimming pool in season, and 28 elegantly appointed rooms. Every room offers a commanding panoramic view of the western sky, the tidal Sheepscot River and the village of Wiscasset, Maine’s prettiest village.

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